Like the post Christmas fitness regime January has been a very dry month for new music. Apart from the recently featured 80’s synth house ‘Aquazoo‘ via Bristol’s Banoffee Pies Records and Readings BBC Music Sound of 2017 contenders, The Amazons, we have found precious little else. Thankfully whilst trawling the net today we stumbled across Soma Records forthcoming Soma25 Compilation. Celebrating 25 years of existence and perhaps most significantly being the first label to release a Daft Punk record, the compilation features a Slam re-interpretation of the previously unreleased track: Daft Punk – Drive.

Daft Punk - Drive

In addition to Daft Punk – Drive the 5 piece vinyl box set also features music from Robert Hood, Jeff Mills, Josh Wink, Blawan, Funk D’Void and of course label owners Slam [Listen to LP Teaser Here]. However for the purposes of this post we want to focus on the Daft Punk track.

Earlier this month we wrote an article on how anyone can write songs/music and listening to the original of Daft Punk – Drive we’re convinced more than ever in our conclusions. Drive is unmistakable Daft Punk, yet as the track develops you can see why Slam elected not to release Drive. It’s by no means a shocker and the raw energy of their earlier work is unmistakably present. However in this instance that raw energy lacks coherence and the two lead hooks just don’t quite work. Why is this significant? Well it demonstrates that even the mightiest of mighty didn’t have it all sown up from the beginning. Like the rest of us they had to keep learning, honing their craft and believing at some point they’d write something good enough to be released. That said, before you start investing hours of your life chasing that most illusive of dreams, a record deal, you may want to consider a few other crucial points we raised in our Songwriting piece.

Daft Punk – Drive (Unreleased)