CHARITABLE WORK

Part 5 ‘Go Jonny Go’ An Unexpected Journey by Blah Blah Blah…

Morocco, or more specifically ‘Ourrzazate’, the gateway to the Sahara, was to be our final moment of civilisation, before the MDS crew corralled our 1200 souls into plush air conditioned coaches and shipped us into the heart of the Desert. And with the air con blasting and our sizeable complementary pack lunch in hand it is fair to say, in hindsight, that the level of comfort and luxury was no more than a cunning fisherman’s lure drawing us hopelessly towards are impending doom…

[DAY 1 – High Spirits/Acclimatisation]
Despite a 6 hour flight and a 3 hour transfer to the start line the hubbub of anticipation was palpable as we all made ourselves familiar with the bivouac aka campsite, met our fellow tent mates and got our equipment checked. And with ECG’s signed off, equipment ratified and introductions completed, it was time for one last complimentary meal, before switching to race rations and fending for ourselves…

Day 2 – Highway To Hell [Stage 1: Distance 34km]
Where to start…6.30am wake up call, 8.30 start – temperature all ready a sweltering 30°c. Breakfast rehydrated Granola (800 kCal) – disgusting, washed down with warm water, back sore and legs heavy from a terrible nights sleep, sand in every crack imaginable and not a pot of tea in sight, let alone a bowl of cornflakes. Yet despite all this, confidence was high, and like any other sport I’ve ever participated in I, somewhat naively, believed I could win. The only thing between me and certain victory was 34km of Saharan Sand Dunes…

Each day started the same with us being herded to the start line, where we were given a security briefing, a course description, whilst also celebrating birthday’s and honouring casualties, before AC/DC’s ‘Highway To Hell’ is blasted from the sound system and the race begins in earnest. On that first day crossing the start line was an enthralling and memorable experience, almost carnival esque with music blasting, arms waving and helicopter flyby’s filming our every step. What lay ahead held no fear…well at least for 30 minutes it didn’t and then we hit the sandunes, and like a watery desert mirage all that goodwill swiftly evaporated as legs seized, dehydration took hold and unscheduled sand storms smeared us into submission. For me in particular my race collapsed between checkpoints 2 & 3 where I was physically sick from dehydration and had to receive urgent medical assistance. After an hour of recuperation I was just about well enough to get going again, eventually stumbling across the finishing line 7hrs after I started, position 465th…

Day 3 – Medical Tent [Stage 2: Distance 41.3km]
Despite Stage 1’s dehydration episode I had made it to Stage 2, all be it with a 30 minute time penalty due to the medical assistance I had required. However my despondency regarding the time penalty was soon put into perspective when we learnt in that mornings briefing that Stage 1 had claimed 30 unfortunate souls, all of whom had been forced to drop out of the race on medical grounds! But as they say, with every cloud…. at least I couldn’t come last now!

Unfortunately, as Stage 2 progressed it quickly became apparent that I hadn’t fully recovered from yesterdays ordeal and although I managed to complete the stage without the need of medical assistance, I found myself once again in the hands of the outstanding medical team as I was promptly whisked from the finish line to the medical tent for another bought of rehydration therapy. Yet despite my obvious plight and discomfort I could once again consider myself fortunate as the three further competitors who joined me in the tent did not enter of their own volition, but had to be stretchered in on emergency drips. As it turns out Stage 2 was the most attritional of all the stages as it eliminated a record 65 competitors.
Day 4 – Salt, Salt, Salt [Stage 3: Distance 37.5km]
My second visit to the medical team had beneficially revealed that the primary reason for my dehydration was not due to a lack of water but rather a lack of salt, with me conclusively taking a drastically insufficient number of the salt tabs provided – 7 per stage as apposed to the recommended 20. Well Im not one for popping pills, as you probably know, but on stage 3 I was double/triple dropping those salt tabs like there was no tomorrow, and it seemed to do the trick as for the first time since being in the Sahara I managed to avoid needing medical help, a small victory in what was no longer a race to win but a race to survive. Sadly, despite my progress, we did lose one of our crew on Day 4. Mitch like me had been struggling with dehydration and somewhere during stage three he had to be urgently plucked from his sandy prison and placed on a drip. A drip that subsequently turned into 3 drips and inevitably immediate disqualification. What were once 8 was now just 7 and Paul, our Scottish compatriot was not looking good either, with feet that more closely resembled an Egyptian burial site than anything else.

Day 5 – Deck Chairs, Tea & LCD Soundsystem [Stage 4: Distance 84.3km]
This stage was without doubt equally the most painful and exhilarating experience of the whole adventure. Summed up perfectly in my immediate post stage Facebook update…
“What a day that was, it was like trying to run to London in 40 degree heat, with a load of sand dunes and small mountains in the way. However checkpoint 5 was amazing – middle of the desert, deck chairs, hot tea and the cosmos lighting up the whole scene, whilst LCD Soundsystem’s ‘Daft Punk Is Playing In My House’ sound-tracked the whole spectacle . The rest of the stage was at night with glowsticks and head torches leading us home. It is epic out here, but most definitely a one time visit”
Day 6/7 – Just A Marathon [Stage 5: 42.2km + Stage 6: 17km]
Officially the final stage of the race with just a paltry 26 miles to the finish line! Our team of 8, minus Mitch, had all made it to the final day, even Paul with his horrendously shredded feet. Thankfully despite my numerous bouts of dehydration and one if its least pleasant side affects, diarrhoea – which would have me dashing off the prescribed route at least 3 times per stage, I had only acquired two small blisters. As a result with the dehydration loosening its merciless hold, my backpack virtually empty, and the temp dropping from a ballistic 38°c to a moderately acceptable 30°c I was able to put my foot down for the first time since being in the desert, finishing with a highly satisfying 163rd out of what was now just 950 competitors.

And that was that, race finished, 150 miles in 6 days completed, all that was left was the Unicef Charity stage and a couple of nights in a plush Moroccan hotel. Our tent lost just the one man, Mitch – who deserves a special mention for generously helping me survive those first two days, Jamie our resident former Marine gave our team respectability with his final position of 120th, whilst Justin also deserves a special mention for doggedly holding onto his middle class sensibilities regardless of what the desert threw at him, typified by his determination to make filter coffee every morning. Greg was our resident comedian and experienced Ultra-Runner/Crazy Person – who as it turns out was running the London Marathon 10 days after our return, madness. Paul and his shredded feet demonstrated that anything is possible if you’re willing to put your mind to it, whilst Jamie’s running buddy David, who finished 201st was the glue that knitted the tent together and last but not least was the diminutive but not to be underestimated Alasdair who kept us all entertained and ultimately fed with his maverick if at times questionable weight shedding techniques.

Day 8 – Hotel [Stage Hotel: Distance 0km]
For the final two days we drank, ate, slept, showered, sat in chairs, swam in the pool and reflected on what had been a remarkable once in a lifetime adventure, an adventure that we all collectively agreed to NEVER do again…

Related Reading
An Unexpected Journey – Part 4/5 ‘Run Forrest Run’
An Unexpected Journey – Part 3/5 ‘A New Hope’
An Unexpected Journey – Part 2/5 ‘Virus’
An Unexpected Journey – Part 1/5 ‘Random Events’

Part 4 ‘Run Forrest Run’ An Unexpected Journey by Blah Blah Blah…

Running is an activity that has been a fundamental part of my existence since those haunting days at school where no PE kit generally resulted in either being ordered to do it in your undies or select some odious pair of long forgotten gym shorts from the ominously smelling lost property box. Thankfully as the years advance running becomes more of a personal choice as apposed to an enforced activity and as such running has generally remained one of the few things I am quite good at. Whats great about running is that it doesn’t involve the need for great skill, you can do it on your own, and apart from a good pair of trainers its not an overly expensive sport to participate in. Furthermore it is universally agreed that physical activity is particularly effective in fighting the symptoms of depression and anxiety, and therefore due to runnings relatively accessibility compared to a gym membership you’ll use twice in January, or the latest pilates-boxercise craze that will soon be replaced by the latest yoga-boxercise craze, you can just get up, put your trainers on and leave the house. There’s no faff involved and with just 20-30 minutes twice a week you’ll be fighting fit both mentally and physically before you know it. However should you randomly decide you want to run across the Sahara Desert you may oddly find yourself wistfully hankering for those glorious days of running around in your undies or someone else’s discarded kit. Unfortunately as appealing as those memories may now seem, they were not an option, it was time to heed the surprisingly common, and not overly original, mocking I have regularly received down the years from many a passing motorist “Run Forrest Run”. Second most common thing to be yelled, and not quite so quotable or as imaginative being, “Oi”!
With the latest “Run Forrest Run” being yelled in my general direction, I was up and running. Progress was slow and painful, and although I didnt experience any serious injury I was beginning to creak and groan more vociferously than the entire membership of the local Lawn Bowls club. But despite my various aches and pains the mileage kept going up and although 100 miles a week was looking less and less likely, I knew I was pushing it as hard as my body would let me.
Three pairs of trainers, a tube of deep heat, and a potentially concerning amount of ibuprofen later I had reached just 60 miles a week prior to departure, not the recommended 80-100 miles. Furthermore I had been training in temperatures closer to 10°c, not the anticipated 40°c of the desert. To say I felt ill prepared to run 155 miles in 6 days across a desert whilst carrying all my own supplies for the whole duration would be the understatement of the century. Alas, it was too late to worry now, and with that I slapped on the factor 50, hoisted my worryingly heavy backpack over my shoulders, set a steely gaze for the horizon and *ran to Gatwick airport…Next stop Morocco and the Sahara Desert [Part 5/6 – Go Jonny Go: to follow soon] 

*Note: Jon didnt actually run to Gatwick Airport, it just sounded more adventurous than getting a lift in his parents Fiat 500.
Donate here [Just Giving] World Vision – The Worlds largest Childrens Charity which fights abuse and offers international disaster relief for children. WV has an exemplary track record of transparency around their finances. With 84% of every pound going to directly to charitable activities: .
Donate Here [Just Giving] The Youth Sports Trust – A UK based organisation that use’s sport to change young people’s lives. Such as the ‘Girls Active’ initiative which looks to tackle the negative image young girls have about their bodies.
Donate Here [Just Giving] Jon E Cassell – In addition to the primary objective of inspiring others and raising money for two organisations that are dynamically trying to shape the world in a positive way Jon also needs to raise £3500 to cover a portion of his own expenses to enter the race. However whilst covering these costs are ultimately important we dont want this request to detract from what we have said above, hence why we have mentioned this last.
Related Reading
An Unexpected Journey – Part 3/6 ‘A New Hope’
An Unexpected Journey – Part 2/6 ‘Virus’
An Unexpected Journey – Part 1/6 ‘Random Events’

Part 3 ‘A New Hope’ An Unexpected Journey by Blah Blah Blah…

With Christmas fast approaching and the final installment of the Marathon Des Sables registration fee imminent it was time to cash in my Insurance policy. An insurance policy I had taken out in the mid 80’s and that had since survived numerous attempts at a premature withdrawal or car boot sale. The time had come, ironically like Luke Skywalker in the Tatooine Desert, to leave my past behind me. And with that my entire collection of vintage Star Wars collectables were placed on eBay…
It was quite a collection I had, it included an X-Wing, B-Wing, Tie Fighter, Scout Walker, ATAT, Millennium Falcon, not to mention over a hundred figures and other highly sought after items. My sale proved to be expertly timed with the combination of Christmas and the hotly anticipated ‘The Force Awakens’ only weeks away from release making my eBay account more attractive than Princess Leia in her gold bikini. Unfortunately I didnt have original boxes and none of my items were in unused mint condition which meant 100’s not 1000’s of pounds, but even still I cleaned up, with my most startling sale being £25 for a 2cm x 5cm piece of perspex, aka an X Wing cockpit canopy, madness!
Ebay was my new best friend, nothing was safe, you got to close and Id sell you faster than you could say “utini” to a passing Jawa. By the time the deadline for my final instalment arrived, Dec 14th, I was able to pay the majority of the balance without the use of my already heavily burdened credit card. Things were looking up. I still didnt have a job, but my money was under control and to lift my spirits further I was informed by my GP that I had an easily curable condition, vitamin D deficiency, or as I like to put it a severe Australia deficiency. As it turns out the lack of Vitamin D in my system was the main reason I was exhausted all the time and unable to train, furthermore low Vitamin D levels can play a significant role in accentuating the symptoms of depression, and therefore this diagnosis was a momentous discovery.
The waiting was finally over and with a slightly heavier post Christmas disposition it was time to discover if my creaking joints could reach the recommended target of running a 100 miles per week. The only thing was I’d lost 2 months from my originally planned 5 month training plan…[Part 4 – Run Forrest Run: to follow soon]

Our Sponsor pages will open to the end of the month if you’d still like to support us.
Donate here [Just Giving] World Vision – The Worlds largest Childrens Charity which fights abuse and offers international disaster relief for children. WV has an exemplary track record of transparency around their finances. With 84% of every pound going to directly to charitable activities: .
Donate Here [Just Giving] The Youth Sports Trust – A UK based organisation that use’s sport to change young people’s lives. Such as the ‘Girls Active’ initiative which looks to tackle the negative image young girls have about their bodies.
Donate Here [Just Giving] Jon E Cassell – In addition to the primary objective of inspiring others and raising money for two organisations that are dynamically trying to shape the world in a positive way Jon also needs to raise £3500 to cover a portion of his own expenses to enter the race. However whilst covering these costs are ultimately important we dont want this request to detract from what we have said above, hence why we have mentioned this last.
Related Reading
An Unexpected Journey – Part 2 ‘Virus’
An Unexpected Journey – Part 1 ‘Random Events’

Part 2 ‘Virus’ An Unexpected Journey by Blah Blah Blah…

Part 2 – Virus
Once again Brighton had stunned with me with an unexpected sucker punch, my guard had dropped and like a tiring prize fighter I was sent reeling into the ropes, dazed and shocked at what had just happened. One minute my future had an element of promise and focus and the next I was scrabbling, yet again, to regain my composure. What made matters worse was that as before I was let down by people I considered friends and to be brutally honest I was incensed at the way I had been treated. But thats business I guess, the almighty buck once again retaining its undisputed heavy weight crown. Im not naive to the fact that business’s sometimes have to make tough financially driven decisions, but I do believe such decision’s can always be handled with greater consideration to the individual, maybe thats a naive notion, but money really isn’t everything!
Losing my job had hit me hard, yet more proof in my eyes, in what had already been a traumatic three years, that I had no value or worth to society at large. I was back living at home, separated from my wife and just as I was piecing things back together my job evaporated like the morning mist. Oh well at least I could train for that STUPID desert race Id entered…
By now it was late October, the last fleeting rays of a typical British summer were migrating South and I was bracing myself for 5 months of sub 10°c winter weather training. Not the ideal preparation for the Sahara Desert but I didnt really care, my legs were well below the 100 miles a week recommendation, sun or no sun I just needed to get running. With my training schedule carefully selected, new trainers broken in and Strava downloaded I was ready to pound the streets and hills of West Sussex. What I was not going to do was hit the canvas and give up, and with the immortal words of Nike ringing in my ears ‘Just Do It’ my training began in earnest.
Sadly my newfound optimism lasted about 2 days and three visits to the doctor, 2 blood tests and an ECG later my training ended faster than a Moroccan dash for the finish line. It would be 2 months and a New Year before I could put my trainers back on…[Part 3 – A New Hope: to follow soon]

Our Sponsor pages will open to the end of the month if you’d still like to support us.
Donate here [Just Giving] World Vision – The Worlds largest Childrens Charity which fights abuse and offers international disaster relief for children. WV has an exemplary track record of transparency around their finances. With 84% of every pound going to directly to charitable activities: .
Donate Here [Just Giving] The Youth Sports Trust – A UK based organisation that use’s sport to change young people’s lives. Such as the ‘Girls Active’ initiative which looks to tackle the negative image young girls have about their bodies.
Donate Here [Just Giving] Jon E Cassell – In addition to the primary objective of inspiring others and raising money for two organisations that are dynamically trying to shape the world in a positive way Jon also needs to raise £3500 to cover a portion of his own expenses to enter the race. However whilst covering these costs are ultimately important we dont want this request to detract from what we have said above, hence why we have mentioned this last.
Related Reading
An Unexpected Journey – Part 1 ‘Random Events’

An Unexpected Journey by Blah Blah Blah…

Part 1 – Random Events
It was a chilly late October morning, 2015, when the email came through “The event organisers have accepted your entry – all you need to do now is make payment of the deposit and return the documents to me asap”, and that was that, unbeknownst to friends or family I had entered the Marathon Des Sables, a 255km 6 day race across the Sahara Desert. It was only two weeks earlier that I had been added to the waiting list, and with entry having closed a good 6 months earlier my inclusion in the 31st addition of the event was as about as likely as England winning the Euro’s. But there I was on the precipice of an event that I had only recently discovered whilst visiting a close surf friend in Cornwall.
Randomly in early October I made a last minute decision to visit Cornwall, a visit that happened to perfectly coincide with Ben Fogle’s Cornwall leg of his ‘Accidental Adventure Tour’. I can’t say I’ve ever been a Fogle fan, he’s frightfully posh and certainly doesn’t fit the underground DJ persona, but my friend had tickets and the location, the stunning cliff top open air Minack Theatre, were enough to win me over, and as the Atlantic ocean rhythmically pounded the rocks below on that balmy October 7th evening something profoundly shifted, I could feel my long lost sense of adventure being gently rekindled. A flame that had long been snuffed out in the frenzied activity of everyday life was flickering back into life, my heart quickened and perhaps for the first time in almost a decade I could feel a sense of hope and excitement for the future. Here is where my unexpected journey really began…
Two weeks after paying my deposit, via my newly acquired credit card, I was promptly made redundant. No warning, I had even just been given a pay rise a few weeks earlier. To say that this was unexpected would be an understatement and with the final payment for the race looming and the subsequent minimum payments unavoidable it is fair to say that my newly acquired optimism had been emphatically dashed against the rocks. What had become a beacon of hope for my future was potentially about to become a millstone around my neck. The deposit was non refundable, I was committed… [Part 2 – Virus]

Our Sponsor pages will open to the end of the month if you’d still like to support us.
Donate here [Just Giving] World Vision – The Worlds largest Childrens Charity which fights abuse and offers international disaster relief for children. WV has an exemplary track record of transparency around their finances. With 84% of every pound going to directly to charitable activities: .
Donate Here [Just Giving] The Youth Sports Trust – A UK based organisation that use’s sport to change young people’s lives. Such as the ‘Girls Active’ initiative which looks to tackle the negative image young girls have about their bodies.
Donate Here [Just Giving] Jon E Cassell – In addition to the primary objective of inspiring others and raising money for two organisations that are dynamically trying to shape the world in a positive way Jon also needs to raise £3500 to cover a portion of his own expenses to enter the race. However whilst covering these costs are ultimately important we dont want this request to detract from what we have said above, hence why we have mentioned this last.

Track Blah Blah Blah in ‘REAL TIME’ as they run across the Sahara

In 6 days time ill be flying out to the Sahara Desert where Ill be expected to run 155 miles in 6 days in 30 degree heat whilst lugging all my camping gear and food for the entire event. Such feats of endurance tend to be for those we like to mock for wearing too much lycra, not DJs with a preference for house and techno. But times have changed with lycra, protein shakes and wiggle.com recently edging out skinny jeans, ale and Phonica Records in my daily routine.

HOW TO FOLLOW
Use the link below and simply register your email. The page will go live at 8pm Sunday 10th April. My race number is [884]: [http://live.marathondessables.com]

WHY 155 MILES IN 6 DAYS – The aim is to inspire those who struggle with depression, anxiety, low self esteem or any other mental condition that erodes their personal sense of self worth and value. For more details on my story and how to sponsor me before and during the event hit the following link: [http://www.weareblahblahblah.com/sponsor/]
Hit one of the three links below to Sponsor
Donate here [Just Giving] World Vision – The Worlds largest Childrens Charity which fights abuse and offers international disaster relief for children. WV has an exemplary track record of transparency around their finances. With 84% of every pound going to directly to charitable activities: .
Donate Here [Just Giving] The Youth Sports Trust – A UK based organisation that use’s sport to change young people’s lives. Such as the ‘Girls Active’ initiative which looks to tackle the negative image young girls have about their bodies.
Donate Here [Just Giving] Jon E Cassell – In addition to the primary objective of inspiring others and raising money for two organisations that are dynamically trying to shape the world in a positive way Jon also needs to raise £3500 to cover a portion of his own expenses to enter the race. However whilst covering these costs are ultimately important we dont want this request to detract from what we have said above, hence why we have mentioned this last.

 

Music to Soundtrack a 155 mile Run across the Sahara…

On April 8th 2016 I’ll be running 155 miles across the Sahara Desert in what is considered the toughest foot race on earth, the ‘Marathon Des Sables‘. Not only will I be running 155 miles in 50 degree heat but Im also required to carry all my own essential supplies for the 6 day event; food, water, sleeping bag etc etc, and therefore it is advised you pack as light as possible to increase your chances of survival, essentially meaning, NO luxuries. However if you’re anything like me, travel and adventure has always been synonymous with a particular artist, album or playlist. Consequently I have re-classified my iPod and solar charger as essential NOT luxury, and with only 31 days till the race, its time to add track selection into my weekly training schedule…

Although selecting what music to take is an important element of any adventure, and I’d appreciate your suggestions below, there is actually a much more profound reason for me running across the Sahara. This is not, as some may think, a vanity project to roll out at dinner parties, but actually a statement of intent against the debilitating illness, Depression. According to ‘Mind’ 1 in 4 of us will experience a mental health problem each year with an alarming 17 in every 100 of those having suicidal thoughts. Now some of you reading this may have already switched off thinking this doesn’t apply to me, however, before you move on bear in mind that 1 in 4  essentially means that someone close to you is most likely fighting something and could need your support.
Personally I have been battling depression for more than a decade and whilst I am yet to fully overcome it I have managed to devise a daily system of managing my symptoms. In particular setting myself demanding long-term physical challenges has enabled me to focus on a positive long-term target with daily achievable milestones. This is not to say that I dont have days where the thought of getting out of bed or even breathing seems a complete and utter waste of my time and everyone else’s, but over the years I have learnt that if I force myself to get up and go for a run, that my mood lifts and I am better able to cope with my circumstances. It may not cure my depression and Im not suggesting that if someone is on medication that they should stop taking it and go for a run instead, but what I am saying is that depression, anxiety, low self esteem, dont have to rob us of a fulfilling adventurous life. Having said that it does require those of us who suffer to overcome our pride and reach out for help, which is easier said than done, but on reflection reaching out in 2014 was the best decision I ever made.
Well there we go, I hope my race across the desert has inspired your personally or is something you can inspire others with. I am also raising money for three charities and therefore if you’d like to support my cause beyond sharing this post, hit one of the following ‘Just Giving’ links below. Thanks for reading.
World Vision – Supporting Child Refugees [Just Giving]. Raised £440 
Youth Sports Trust – Supporting Girls with negative images about their bodies [Just Giving]. Raised £200
Kick Start –  [Just Giving]. Raised £520
Foals – Mountain At My Gate (Out Now)

Other Feature Posts…
Fighting for the Right – Adele, Swift, Gaga
YouTube taking on Spotify & Apple Music
How The Producer created Motown, Hip-Hop, Rock & Pop
Jamie XX – Dance music is important to me, it makes me happy
Format Wars – The Future of Music
16.4 Billion Streams on Spotify – Adele 25

150 Miles in 6 Days across the Sahara Desert! – Marathon Des Sables

Come April 8th ‘Blah Blah Blah’ aka Jon E Cassell will be running 150 miles in 6 days across the Sahara Desert, which is effectively 6 Marathons in 6 days in 50°c heat. The race is called the Marathon Des Sables and is widely regarded as the toughest foot race on earth (see pictures below). Like most of his family and friends you are probably thinking why? Well, long story short, the aim is to inspire those who struggle with depression, anxiety, low self esteem or any other mental condition that erodes their personal sense of self worth and value. Jon himself has been battling with depression and a dangerously low sense of self worth most of his life, however it wasnt until 2013 that things got really serious and he was forced to seek help and take action. Amongst the usual forms of suggested health care, medication, counseling etc it became apparent that his participation in sport and regular strenuous physical activity had been playing a key role in keeping his head just above the waves all these years. With this revelation Jon is hoping that starting with this race and beyond that he will be able to inspire and encourage others to tackle their demons head on and despite their own personal struggles in turn inspire others to do the same. It doesn’t mean however that everyone needs to run across the desert, the challenge needs to be relative to you as a person, something to aim for and achieve. It could be running 10k, learning to Surf, it could be not watching East Enders and going for a walk instead, the key is that it needs to be something challenging and ultimately rewarding and where possible involve some element of community and the great outdoors. However its important to note that we are not suggesting this as an alternative to professional medical support but rather as an effective and dynamic support.

Jon is also raising money for two charities, World Vision and the Youth Sports Trust.
World Vision – The Worlds largest Childrens Charity which fights abuse and offers international disaster relief for children. WV has an exemplary track record of transparency around their finances. With 84% of every pound going to directly to charitable activities: Donate here [Just Giving].
The Youth Sports Trust – A UK based organisation that use’s sport to change young people’s lives. Such as the ‘Girls Active’ initiative which looks to tackle the negative image young girls have about their bodies: Donate Here [Just Giving].
In addition to the primary objective of inspiring others and raising money for two organisations that are dynamically trying to shape the world in a positive way Jon also needs to raise £3500 to cover a portion of his own expenses to enter the race. However whilst covering these costs are ultimately important we dont want this request to detract from what we have said above, hence why we have mentioned this last. Again donations via [Just Giving].
Well if nothing else we hope you’re feeling inspired to either find your own challenge or at least encourage someone you know to step out and believe they have value and can achieve things they never thought possible. Thanks for reading and if you can share and like this post where ever you can, as you never know who it might help. Back to music tomorrow, take care BBB.
Read More on my Unexpected Journey
[Part 1] An Unexpected Journey
[Part 2] An Unexpected Journey
[Part 3] An Unexpected Journey
[Part 4] An Unexpected Journey
[Part 5] An Unexpected Journey

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